Archivi tag: vispo

jim leftwich @ archive.org

https://archive.org/details/@textimagepoem

Six Months Aint No Sentence, Books 1 – 15, written between 04.24.2011 and 01.13.2012. Originally published by Marco Giovenale at differx hosts as Six Months Aint No Sentence, a Journal: texts and works by Jim Leftwich, 2011 – 2016 Books 1 – 187
https://app.box.com/s/l76xlrg78e5s8evbi4c4
Books 1 – 30 were published by Peter Ganick and Jukka-Pekka Kervinen at White Sky E-Books.

poetry, visual poetry, asemic writing, historiography, writing against itself, useless writing, journal, textimagepoem, trashpo, desemantized writing, 21st Century American epic, collage poem, ongoing research

the we grrr ironing think / jim leftwich and jeff crouch, 2021

https://archive.org/details/2021-the-we-grrr-ironing-think-jeff-crouch-jim-leftwich/mode/2up

here it is too:

Fai clic per accedere a 2021-the-we-grrr-ironing-think-jeff-crouch-jim-leftwich.pdf

(slowforward.files.wordpress.com/2021/07/2021-the-we-grrr-ironing-think-jeff-crouch-jim-leftwich.pdf)

memoria: la prima installance, 24 agosto 2010 / differx. 2021

la prima installance, 24 agosto 2010:
https://installance.blogspot.com/2010/08/installance-001-asemic-sibyl.html

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ora il vecchio blog è di nuovo in funzione (reso di nuovo visibile).
arriva fino al 15 giugno 2015.

dopo quella data, tutte le installance vecchie sono state caricate anche su slowforward, e le nuove vengono inserite solo su slowforward.

installance.blogspot.com, dunque, di nuovo visibile, resterà esclusivamente come archivio sequenziale. per ricostruire le vicende dal 2010 al 2015.

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“garbage collection”, by jaap blonk (red fox press, 2021)

For Garbage Collection Jaap Blonk made collages from trash paper and all kinds of cheap stuff. All of them also feature his asemic scribbles, that are distant descendants of the symbols he created for the notation of his sound poems.
Then he processed them digitally – only the colours, not the forms – with many different self-coded algorithms that he developed over the years.

 

Jaap Blonk (born 1953 in Woerden, Netherlands) is a self-taught composer, performer, poet and visual artist.
His unfinished studies in mathematics and musicology mainly created a penchant for activities in a Dada vein, as did several unsuccessful jobs in offices and other well-organized systems.
In the late 1970s he started to compose music. A few years later he discovered his potential as a vocal performer, at first in reciting poetry and later on in improvisations and his own compositions. From the mid-1990s on Blonk started work with electronics as well.
Since 2006 he has been using mathematics again for algorithmic composition for the creation of music, visual work and poetry.
As a vocalist, Jaap Blonk is unique for his powerful stage presence and keen grasp of structure. He has performed around the world, on all continents. With the use of live electronics and interactive visuals the scope and range of his concerts has acquired a considerable extension.
Blonk’s recorded output comprises some 50 titles: CDs, vinyl, books and cassettes.
From his sound poetry scores he developed an independent body of visual work, which has been published and exhibited.

http://redfoxpress.com/dada-blonk.html

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the meaning machine (simplified version) / differx. 2018

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farewell to david-baptiste chirot

It’s impossible for me to say how sad I feel in reading now that artist and friend David-Baptiste Chirot has passed away.

We started talking, and exchanging works via the net, in 2006-2007, if I’m not wrong.
He’s been contributing for years to my blogs, like fluxishare.blogspot.com, and free online editions (like differxhost: https://it.scribd.com/doc/22212352/D-B-Chirot-Killer-Chrome or gammm: https://it.scribd.com/doc/22218970/chirot-death-from-this-window or slowforward: https://slowforward.net/2009/07/26/david-baptiste-chirots-ghost-dancers/).

Farewell, David. I’ll go on admiring your works and sharing them.

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See more in several sites and blogs (issues of Otoliths, e.g. —to name one. And…):
https://xexoxial.org/pdf/xerolage_32.pdf
http://dbqp.blogspot.com/2005/07/rock-and-wall-animal-david-baptiste.html
http://fluxlist.blogspot.com/2007/02/david-baptiste-chirot.html
https://slowforward.net/2007/08/15/vanguardening/
https://differx.blogspot.com/search/label/David-Baptiste%20Chirot%20and%20Marco%20Giovenale
https://fluxishare.blogspot.com/search/label/david-baptiste%20chirot
https://slowforward.net/2008/07/28/david-baptiste-chirot-cinema-of-catharsis/
https://slowforward.net/2007/08/25/d-b-chirot-flickr/
https://slowforward.net/2007/03/23/ubertrashung-garage103/
https://slowforward.net/2007/05/27/ubertrashung/
https://slowforward.net/?s=chirot

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My work is guided by a profound faith in the Found, everywhere hidden in plain
site/sight/cite.

DBC
(http://www.bigbridge.org/DBCBio.pdf)

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die leere mitte, issue #10

carlyle baker: “tropes”

of course the asemic is absurd / jim leftwich. 2021

If I am writing about the word “asemic”, I am thinking about patience and persistence. I am thinking about failure as a source of energy, as that which keeps an absurdist idea of enlightenment alive and almost thriving. Standing in the absurd center of the asemic universe, we are surrounded by unexamined exits and entrances, unexplored starting-points, multiple escape-routes leading out in all directions. 
We need to synchronize our watches, then throw them all away. We need to get on the same page of the same map-book, then throw all the maps away. We need to set our compasses, and throw them away. We must promise each other to get together, at some unspecified time and place, later in our lives, to define our terms and make public our consensus definitions. Until then, we have some exploring to do, some making and some thinking, some reading and some writing.
Tim Gaze wrote, in an email responding to my recent texts (05.21.2021), that “asemic is an absolute state, whereas desemantizing is a process or matter of degree”.
He also wrote in the same email that he “consciously let go of asemic writing several years back”.
On January 27, 1998, I wrote to Tim, saying “the asemic text would seem to be an ideal, an impossibility, but possibly worth pursuing for just that reason.”
Desemantized writing is not an ideal, is not an impossibility. It is a very specific kind of writing, produced for very specific reasons. To desemantize writing is to intentionally make it less readable, less capable of participating in the language-game of giving information. 
We might aspire to the absolute state of asemic writing, producing beautiful and/or provocative failures in our quest, but we achieve desematized writing, to one degree or another, whenever we choose to do so.
In response to my recent texts, John M. Bennett wrote (05.20.2021) “i like ‘desemanticized’ better than ‘asemic’ myself; the latter term was always a bit misleading, even downright wrong sometimes, I thought; except perhaps in a few situations…”
In the late 1990s, “asemic” was not the word I wanted or needed, but it was the best I had at the time. For the past 20 years or so I have been exploring alternatives to the word “asemic”. For now, and for my purposes (which are not necessarily the same purposes as those of some likely readers of this text), “desemantized” (or “desemanticized”) is an improvement, a step in the right direction. It is a provisional solution to a problem.
These days, the term “asemic writing” is very widely used, and is surely in no danger of being discarded or replaced. My thoughts about the term “desemantized writing” will circulate, if at all, within the context of the global asemic writing community. As I write this, in the late spring of 2021, the theory and practice of asemic writing are not in any sense dead, the possibilities have not been exhausted. The Sisyphean struggle to attain the absolute state of asemic writing, absurd though it may be, continues to yield moments of existential fulfillment, and perhaps every now and then even a kind of happiness. 
My hope for my recent writings is that they might invigorate an increasingly faceted vision of the world of all things asemic.

jim leftwich, may 2021

keep moving / jim leftwich. 2021

I was a poet, and for me that meant pushing the edges of poetry, and the edges of myself while writing poetry. The line was an edge, and the rhyme was an edge, and the stanza was an edge, and the syllable was an edge. Eventually it became impossible to ignore the idea of the letter as an edge. Once having agreed to that, it became impossible to ignore the shapes of the letter — first the shapes of the printed letters, in an array of fonts, and then the shapes of the handwritten letters.

From the outset, the idea of producing meanings had been for me subordinate to the idea of making poems. If all I had wanted to do was produce meanings, I would have written conventional sentences and paragraphs. But that was not what I wanted.

So I wrote poems, and I pushed the edges of the poem, and in doing that I was pushing the edges of myself, my sense of satisfaction and achievement, my sense of my own skills and competence, and I was never satisfied, intentionally, by choice, never satisfied, I refused to accept the sense of being satisfied, so eventually, inevitably, I found myself producing desemantized or asemic writings.

And that was a plateau, a stage, and I knew from the outset that I was only passing through, that I would never be satisfied with desemantized or asemic writing, any more than I had been satisfied with writing conventional poems.

Over the years a community of asemic writers has become active and visible and, to the extent that I am a part of it at all, my role has evolved to be a kind of advocate for incessant criticality. As a participant in the conversation around asemic writing, I can be counted on to say something similar to “yes, you are right, but…” Yes, you are right, but that is not enough, it is not even particularly important. What is important is to keep moving. Asemic writing works for you? Fantastic. Now move on and do something else.

Jim Leftwich

recent posts @ repository magazine (cecil touchon, editor)

For me, the practice of asemic writing began in processes I was using in the mid-to-late 1990s to write textual poems. Beginning with a…
Monsters in Trousers  9:27 PM 5/7/2018 (collage poetry)   We use language to separate, to violently tear ourselves [apart]. There is…
 
Watch this ZOOM conversation I have with Michelle Moloney King; Editor of Beir Bua Press
Rosaire Appel: “asemic writing is also a way of leaping forward into territory not yet conceptualized… a transition strategy perhaps” (Jun…
Non fungible tokens have been around for a minute and I myself have only known about the idea for a few weeks. But here are some initial…
On view (in 2014) at Lanoue Gallery in Boston
Essay for an exhibition held April 15, 2016 — June 15, 2016
Following up on the first article: On Being an Artist

“oei”, april 10 and 11: moving mountains & mounting transitions 

OEI_moving_mountainsMoving mountains & mounting transitions

2 days on “editorial thinking” with OEI at Index – The Swedish Contemporary Art Foundation

This event will be live-streamed via Index’ Twitch channel: www.twitch.tv/indexfoundation

Saturday April 10 and Sunday April 11, 14:00-17:00

On the occasion of the exhibition Editorial Thinking at Index, OEI magazine organizes a two-day event, inviting artists, editors, publishers, writers, and scholars to reflect on the notion of “editorial thinking” in relation to their different practices. Each day will comprise two sessions and will be live streamed via Twitch. The talks take in conversations around editing and publishing as artistic and literary practices, as well as focusing on new and latest publications by OEI.
Guests include Alice Centamore, Pierre Paulin, Michalis Pichler, Nils Olsson, Sezgin Boynik, Lytle Shaw, Axel Andersson.

Saturday 10 April, 14:00-17:00
Addressing “(im)proper places for other books”, Michalis Pichler will talk about historical and recent initiatives of artists who have tried to break out of the process of cultural confinement of their books. This talk will be followed by a short lecture by Nils Olsson on editorial practices taking its cue from Walter Benjamin’s “The author as producer”. Joining us from Paris, Pierre Paulin and Alice Centamore will focus on editing and publishing through the lenses of art, poetry, archives, and curating.

Sunday 11 April, 14:00-17:00
After an introduction to some of the complexities between fieldwork and editing by Jonas (J) Magnusson & Cecilia Grönberg, Lytle Shaw will talk about his new book New Grounds for Dutch Landscape (OEI editör), where he uses an experimental, site-specific method to demonstrate how 17th century painters Jan van Goyen, Jacob van Ruisdael, and Meindert Hobbema did not so much represent the newly made landscape of Holland as re-enact its reclamation and ongoing threats to its stability.
Axel Andersson presents his new book Negative Geology – A Cultural and Technical History of Early European Mountaineering (OEI editör), on mountaineering before Romanticism, which traces the interconnected developments in literature, visual arts, philosophy and technology contributing to the continent’s intense interest in mountains. Sezgin Boynik, the guest editor of the latest issue of OEI, #90–91: “Sickle of Syntax & Hammer of Tautology. Concrete and Visual Poetry in Yugoslavia, 1968–1983”, tackles the question of how to edit avantgarde archives while introducing this new OEI issue.

*** Continua a leggere

canale telegram di slowforward: materiali di ricerca (scritture, audio, arte)

è nato un canale Telegram per materiali e aggiornamenti legati alla ricerca artistica, musicale, testuale, video, che integra e amplia il lavoro che slowforward sta facendo da 18 anni.

chi è interessato alla sperimentazione recente (o, in certi casi, ‘storica’/storicizzata) può iscriversi e seguire il link https://t.me/slowforward

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otoliths, issue #60

Issue sixty of OTOLITHS, the southern summer, 2021, is now live. Rounding out fifteen years of the journal, it maintains the eclectic & exciting mix of visuals & text that has graced it since its beginning. Included in this issue are Christian ALLE, Constant Laval Williams, Sanjeev Sethi, Seth Leeper, Kelsey Swancott, hiromi suzuki, DS Maolalai, Louise Landes Levi, Diana Magallón, Jonathan Minton, S. K. Kelen, Lynn Strongin, Arrowsmith Forge, Pete Spence, Kon Μarkοgiannis, Jim Leftwich, Michael Leach, Mark Danowsky, Timothy Pilgrim, John Stickney, Jack Galmitz, Doug Bolling, Michael Sikkema, Kristin Garth, Kyle Hemmings, Joanna Walkden Harris, Pete Spence, Elaine Woo, Craig Cotter, Charles Borkhuis, Mary Kasimor, Kyle Seibel, Vernon Frazer, Judith Skillman, Owen Bullock, Grzegorz Wróblewski, Nathan Whiting, Seth A. Howard, Jeff Crouch, Ian Goodale, Barnaby Smith, Chidambar Navalgund, Shloka Shankar, Jeff Harrison, John M. Bennett, Adam Rousopoulos, J. D. Nelson, Darrell Petska, Karl Kempton, Jenny Enochsson, Jen Schneider, Ryan Scott, Nico Vassilakis, Doug Jones, Olivier Schopfer, Tom Montag, Simon Perchik, Luis Cuauhtémoc Berriozábal, AG Davis, Naomi Buck Palagi, Scott Helmes & Carol Stetser, Tony Beyer, Tom Beckett, Cecelia Chapman, Vera Constantineau, Eric Hoffman, Bruno Neiva, Clara B. Jones, Dave Read, Bob Lucky, gobscure, Harvey Huddleston, Isabel Gómez de Diego, Oormila Vijayakrishnan Prahlad, Richard Kostelanetz, Kathup Tsering, M.J. Iuppa, Penelope Weiss, Joseph Salvatore Aversano, David Lohrey, Lewis LaCook, George Myers, Jr., Nathan Anderson, Jake Sheff, Johannes S. H. Bjerg, Keith Nunes, Jeff Bagato, Kell Nelson, Anna Cates, Elmedin Kadric, Andrew Pascoe, Toby Fitch, Marcia Arrieta, Jim Meirose, Joel Chace, John Levy, Marilyn Stablein, K.S. Ernst & Sheila E. Murphy, Natsuko Hirata, Alan (Chong) Lau, Alberto Vitacchio, Claudia Serea, Steven Fraccaro, Bob Heman, Randee Silv, Valeria Sangiorgi, Mark Pirie, Casey Bush, Carla Bertola, horace p sternwall, Michael Brandonisio, Kirsty Lewin, Eve Rifkah, Paul Pfleuger, Jr., Vassilis Zambaras, Edward Kulemin, Thomas Fink, Maya D. Mason, Zebulon Huset, Robert Knight, Kristian Patruno, Adam Rosenkranz, Peter Yovu, Guy R. Beining, & with a cover photo by Daniel de Culla which incorporates a cover photo of  issue fifty-seven.

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